Category Archives: environment

What Does International Polar Bear Day Mean for Bears’ Future?

Today (February 27) is International Polar Bear Day. This year’s observance of the day is especially significant as polar bears continue to be an indicator species for the health of the Arctic and the planet generally.  The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service recently released a new plan for protecting polar bears finding that, “the single most important achievement for polar bear conservation is decisive action to address Arctic warming.” Polar bears depend on sea ice to catch prey and for… Continue reading

Over 20 Scientists Come Together to Oppose CPW Killing Studies

Last week, over 20 scientists came together to oppose Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s (CPW) two carnivore killing studies. These proposed studies, one in the Piceance Basin and the other near the Upper Arkansas River, would kill large numbers of mountain lions and black bears in a misguided attempt to increase mule deer populations in Colorado. Shocked by these studies, I contacted Adrian Treves, Ph.D., whom studies carnivore coexistence at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I asked him to look over the… Continue reading

Unknown Tourism: Commemorating the Wildlife We’ve Lost

  In a series of vintage-style travel posters, Expedia UK illustrates places you can travel to today, but species that have vanished.  The Unkown Tourism series highlights six species that the world has lost to extinction. From the commonly-known thylacine and dodo to the less well-known Jamaican giant galliwast, the travel posters give viewers a visual reminder of wildlife that has slipped away. “We created the posters as a way of paying tribute to some of the amazing animals we’ve lost and… Continue reading

Mexico: Say NO to Copper Mining in the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve

While the U.S. channels millions of dollars into research, citizen science outreach, and public education on the importance of the Monarch butterfly migration, Mexico is considering the approval of permits that would allow its largest mining company with the country’s worst environmental record to reopen a copper mine in the heart of the Monarchs’ ancestral roosting sites. Continue reading

The War against Poaching In 2016

This is a guest post from Jack Smith. Poaching has been around almost as long as people have been hungry, but only became an offense during the late middle ages when the right to hunt was limited to landowners. Clearly, back then the reasons were to protect the nobility’s right to sport rather than for wildlife conservation. Things changed somewhat during 1700’s, at a time when poaching was a means of survival for many. Poaching gangs began selling on the… Continue reading

Mexican Gray Wolves Need More Help

This is a guest post from animal activist and advocate Barbara Troeger. Mexican gray wolf recovery The Mexican gray wolf reintroduction into the wild is the third and most recent such wolf introduction in the United States. Red wolves were introduced into North Carolina in 1987, from an initial set of 14 “founders”; they now number fewer than 45 in the wild. The Northern Rockies were repopulated with 54 wild gray wolves from Canada in 1995; there are now 1,704.… Continue reading

Anti-Science Wolf Delisting Bill Passes House of Representatives

The House of Representatives recently passed the Sportsmen’s Heritage and Recreational Enhancement Act of 2015 (H.R. 2406), and in doing so approved an amendment to strip wolves of Endangered Species Act (the Act) protections in Wyoming, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan. If passed by the Senate and enacted into law, this legislation would return management of wolves to these states. Federal courts have repeatedly ruled that the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and these states states did not follow the law in… Continue reading