Category Archives: wildlife

1.8 Million Americans Speak Out Against Stripping Federal Protections from Wolves 

Almost two million Americans stated their opposition to the Trump administration’s proposal to strip endangered species protections from gray wolves in a comment period that closed today. This is one of the largest numbers of comments ever submitted on a federal decision involving endangered species and reflects broad dissatisfaction with the Trump administration’s politically driven move to turn wolf management over to state agencies across most of the lower 48 states. 

Continue reading

For Wildlife, There’s No App for That

This is a guest post from Trisha White at the National Wildlife Federation.   Thanks to smartphones and applications (apps), we can easily swipe and tap for everything we need right from the comfort of our couch and have it delivered to our door. From food to friends to fantasy vacations, we humans now have it all at our fingertips. But wildlife can’t be slackers–no one delivers to a nest or den. Turtles don’t have Tinder to find mates, they… Continue reading

#BecauseLoboWeek

It’s that time again, y’all – #LoboWeek2019! It has been 21 years since the Mexican gray wolf (also referred to as the Lobo) was returned to the wilds of southern New Mexico and Arizona. Their persistence, despite years of mismanagement and suppression, is astounding. So this week is to them! Raise your glasses and / or mugs in their honor! To me, the lobo represents a fullness that flows beyond them. Their presence on the land depicts health and equity.… Continue reading

Massive Opposition to Drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge at BLM Hearing

On Wednesday, February 13, 2019, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) held a hearing in Washington, D.C. to receive testimony regarding their recent Coastal Plain Oil and Gas Leasing Program Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The room was packed with citizens greatly concerned about the threat of oil and gas development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge’s Coastal Plain, a pristine and ecologically sensitive wilderness area fought over by environmentalists and developers since the 1970s. The coastal plain, a 2,000… Continue reading

Energy development threatens big game herds in Wyoming (and why it matters outside the state, too)

This is a guest post by Dr. Kristen Gunther. It was originally published on ensia.com. Wyoming is sprawling and sparsely populated, home to some of the most awe-inspiring, intact lands and ecosystems in North America. Tourists from all over the world flock to Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks to spot iconic wildlife such as elk, bison, deer and pronghorn. Hunters travel here for once-in-a-lifetime experiences chasing big game through Wyoming’s rugged mountains and desert basins. Wyoming also plays an… Continue reading

It’s time to end killing contests

Wildlife killing contests are legally, morally and scientifically wrong. Scientists, conservationists, hunters, and farmers, know that indiscriminate killing is ineffective in controlling livestock losses because only some, often few, individual predators participate in depredation. Killing contests are not a reliable method of regulating deer populations either. There is zero scientific justification for it. Deer populations are much more influenced by food supply and climate conditions than any natural predator outside of man. These contests do just the opposite of the intention,… Continue reading

Protect Our National Parks

Our National Parks represent a global model for conservation and inspire millions of visitors annually. Yet the present government shutdown, which started on December 21st, 2018, has led to a staffing and maintenance crisis in National Parks. Damage occurring to our parks as a consequence of keeping parks open during the government shutdown is a catastrophe for public lands and wildlife.

Continue reading

Landmark Legislation to Protect Wildlife Corridors Introduced in the Senate and House

WASHINGTON, D.C. (December 6, 2018)—Marking the most significant step toward national wildlife conservation in decades, the Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act was introduced today in the Senate by Sen. Tom Udall (D-NM) and in the House of Representatives by Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA). If passed, the Act will restore habitat and protect America’s native wildlife by establishing a National Wildlife Corridors Program that facilitates the designation of wildlife corridors on federal lands and provides grants to protect wildlife corridors on non-federal… Continue reading

The Midterm results could be the difference between extinction and conservation

The 2018 midterm election could determine the fate of the Endangered Species Act and how hard we have to fight to keep wolves, grizzly bears, and sage grouse safe from political attacks. What we and our neighbors do on November 6th could dictate the fate of endangered and threatened species for the next several years. By choosing to vote, we can take part in the most effective and meaningful individual action to protect plants, fish, and wildlife. Hopefully, you are… Continue reading

The heartbreaking story of Tahlequah (J35)

When humans experience grief, we often turn to music to express deep emotions of loss and sorrow. Many of us are feeling a profound sense of grief and loss with the recent death of the baby orca born by mother orca J35 (named Tahlequah by the Whale Museum).  Beyond the tragedy of the death of this critically endangered animal, we are collectively witnessing the power of the connection between mother and baby, as Tahlequah carries her baby’s body with her… Continue reading