Tag Archives: IUCN

The War against Poaching In 2016

This is a guest post from Jack Smith. Poaching has been around almost as long as people have been hungry, but only became an offense during the late middle ages when the right to hunt was limited to landowners. Clearly, back then the reasons were to protect the nobility’s right to sport rather than for wildlife conservation. Things changed somewhat during 1700’s, at a time when poaching was a means of survival for many. Poaching gangs began selling on the… Continue reading

New Zealand Government Willfully Allowing Extinction of Native Dolphins

The New Zealand government is willfully allowing the extinction of their own native dolphin species, the endangered Hector’s dolphin (Cephalorhynchus hectori) and the critically endangered Maui’s Dolphin (Cephalorhynchus hectori maui). New Zealand marine scientist Dr. Elisabeth “Liz” Slooten is doing everything she can to stop it. Continue reading

Bees are in trouble

This is a guest post by Sarina Jepsen, Endangered Species Program Director for the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation and Deputy Chair of the IUCN Bumblebee Specialist Group It seems like every time I open my email or turn on the radio, I find the message: Save the honey bee – it’s an important pollinator and it’s in trouble. As someone who has spent a number of years working on the conservation of some of the not-so-charismatic (albeit extremely important)… Continue reading