Tag Archives: Gray Wolves

Coalition of Great Lakes Advocates Promote Positive Benefits of Wolves with “Big, Not Bad” Campaign

Madison, WI –The Endangered Species Coalition, along with Wolfwatcher, Nature 365, Friends of the Wisconsin Wolf & Wildlife, among others, have launched a year long campaign in the Western Great Lakes to help demonstrate that wolves are a public asset, beloved by the citizens who live here. The majority of citizens, including those living amongst wolves, representing all walks of life including hunters, hikers, naturalists and farmers of Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Michigan believe that wolves belong on the landscape and… Continue reading

Why the Latest War on Wolves? Three Reasons You May Not Know

My son always roots for the predator. He says they have to eat too. As someone who has a science background and as a conservationist, I know that I should agree with him. Or at a minimum, I should probably be neutral. But I can’t help it. When I’m sitting on my couch watching a nature documentary, I root for the prey. Go rabbit! When it comes to managing wildlife though, I root for the predator. Why? Because wildlife policies… Continue reading

The Fight for Women and Wolves

We will be posting three blogs in the coming days representing different perspectives of Endangered Species Coalition staff that work on wolf recovery and protections.   A couple weeks ago, I was in Phoenix talking to a friend.  She said, “Women and wolves…” And paused for a moment, gathering her thoughts.  “We’re like this,” as she raised her hand with her index and middle fingers crossed.  What she was describing didn’t have any other words attached, but I immediately understood… Continue reading

Oregonians Oppose Hunting of Wolves

A new poll conducted by Mason Dixon Polling and Research finds that the vast majority of Oregon voters — from both rural and urban areas — oppose using hunting as a management tool for wolves in the state and believe wildlife officials wrongly removed state protections from wolves. The poll also revealed that most Oregonians believe nonlethal methods should be the primary focus in reducing conflicts between wolves and livestock. Continue reading

Attacks on Endangered Species Act Hiding Behind Bad Attitudes and Bad Science

Wolves in the Western Great Lakes remain under Endangered Species Act (ESA) protection following a federal court decision in December 2014. Judge Howell criticized the states for inadequate regulatory mechanisms. The court ruled the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service failed to address the impact of combined mortality such as disease and human killing. Prior to this ruling, more than 1,500 wolves have been killed through recreational hunting and trapping resulting in a substantial reduction in wolf populations. This added human-caused mortality… Continue reading

Anti-Science Wolf Delisting Bill Passes House of Representatives

The House of Representatives recently passed the Sportsmen’s Heritage and Recreational Enhancement Act of 2015 (H.R. 2406), and in doing so approved an amendment to strip wolves of Endangered Species Act (the Act) protections in Wyoming, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan. If passed by the Senate and enacted into law, this legislation would return management of wolves to these states. Federal courts have repeatedly ruled that the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and these states states did not follow the law in… Continue reading

U.S. Representative Beyer Speaks out for Wolves

Representative Don Beyer (D-VA8) has received more than 2,000 letters from constituents about the possible delisting of gray wolves under the Endangered Species Act. In fact, he says he has received more letters on this issue than almost everything else combined: Continue reading

Twenty Years Later

Twenty years ago this week, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologists released eight gray wolves into the wilds of Yellowstone National Park, restoring the top predator to the park’s landscape after a 30-year hiatus. Before the year’s end, a female from the Rose Creek pack and a male from the Crystal Creek pack joined up to create the first free-forming pack of wolves observed in Yellowstone in half a century. Biologists named it the Leopold pack, after the conservation… Continue reading